Biology News
He turns color into a precision tool to untangle the 'dance of molecules' - STAT


STAT
We're trying to expand the palette because everything has to work together: the microscopes, the molecular biology to express the tags and other proteins inside the cell, and the data analysis. The ability to tune these dyes allows us to better match ...

TCR signal strength controls the differentiation of CD4 - Science


Science
T cell differentiation into effector and memory T cell subsets is influenced by T cell receptor (TCR) signals. Snook et al. examine how TCR signals influence CD4+ T cell differentiation using a panel of cloned TCRs that recognize the same MHC II ...

Cell Studio: Serious games for immunology - Phys.Org


Phys.Org
The novel platform, known as Cell Studio, can simulate an organic microenvironment with biological and biophysical rules at the cellular level. Several biological scenarios can be simulated, including a 2-D or 3-D spatial patch of tissue or cell ...

Yeast Cell Cycle Analysis Project

Stanford - United States

Resource for information on yeast genes regulated over the cell division cycle, from Stanford University, California.

Related
Cell Cycle Info
Canada

The cell cycle refers to the events that take place in a cell between its inception and subsequent replication. The cell cycle is composed of 4 distinct phases: G1 phase, S phase, G2 phase, and M phase. Interphase is a collective term that describes the G1, S, and G2 phases. During interphase, the cell is growing and preparing for mitosis (M phase) by accumulating nutrients and replicating DNA. The M phase is composed of 2 coupled processes calle

The Stages of the Cell Cycle
United States

The stages of cell division (G1, S, G2. mitosis) are described and illustrated with an animation of the cell cycle: - G1 and G2 stand for 'gaps'. This refers to the fact that nothing very obvious is occurring in the nucleus of the cells during these stages. The cells are actually very active. They are growing and preparing to divide. - S stands for synthesis. This is the phase of the cell cycle in which the DNA is copied or replicated. - M s

Cell Cycle and Mitosis Tutorial
United States

Includes images and a QuickTime animation of the process.

Cell Cycle - Tocris Bioscience
United Kingdom

The cell cycle is the regulatory network that controls the order and timing of cellular proliferation events. It is divided into four stages, G1-S-G2-M. The G1 and G2 stages stands for 'GAP 1' and 'GAP 2' respectively. The S stage stands for 'Synthesis' and is the stage when DNA replication occurs. The M stage stands for 'mitosis', and is when nuclear and cytoplasmic division occurs, halving the genome.

Landes Bioscience Journals: Cell Cycle
United States

Cell Cycle covers all topics from man to virus, from DNA to RNA, from aging to development, from cell senescence to stem cells, from apoptosis to autophagy, from cancer to neurobiology, from molecular and theoretical biology to medicine and therapy. Cell Cycle utilizes an online submission and tracking system designed to provide efficient service to authors. Through the online system, author files are automatically converted to PDFs, submissions

Italy

Announcing the 10th Euroconference, with the 6th course on clinical cytometry run by the ESCCA, with venues in Valencia, Spain, to be held September 21 - 25, 2010.

National Resource for Cell Analysis and Modeling
United States

A national resource center supported by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), at the National Institutes of Health (NIH); portal to the Virtual Cell, including recent publications and applications of the software.

Arabidopsis cDNA Sequence Analysis Project
United Kingdom

Everything you wanted to know about the University of Minnesota's analysis of Arabidopsis ESTs but were afraid to ask.

E-CELL Project
Japan

Develops modeling and simulation software for biochemical and genetic processes.

Thermus thermophilus: Structural-Biological Whole Cell Project
Japan

Provides recent articles and research data on T. thermophilus, a bacterium that can grow at 85 degrees Centigrade. Japanese and English.